Voiceless palatal approximant -

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Voiceless palatal approximant
IPA Number153 402A
Encoding
Entity (decimal)j​̊
Unicode (hex)U+006A U+030A
X-SAMPAj_0

The voiceless palatal approximant is a type of consonantal sound, used in a few spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is ⟨ j̊ ⟩, the voiceless homologue of the voiced palatal approximant.

The palatal approximant can in many cases be considered the semivocalic equivalent of the voiceless variant of the close front unrounded vowel [i̥]. The sound is essentially an English ⟨y⟩ (as in year) pronounced without vibration of the vocal cords.

It is found as a phoneme in Jalapa Mazatec and Washo as well as in Kildin Sami.

Features

Features of the voiceless palatal approximant:

Occurrence

Language Word IPA Meaning Notes
Jalapa Mazatec[1] [example needed] Contrasts voiceless /j̊/, plain voiced /j/ and glottalized voiced /ȷ̃/ approximants.[1]
Scottish Gaelic[2] a-muigh [əˈmuj̊] 'outside' (directional) Allophone of /j/ and /ʝ/. See Scottish Gaelic phonology
Washo t'á:Yaŋi [ˈťaːj̊aŋi] 'he's hunting' Contrasts voiceless /j̊/ and voiced /j/ approximants.
Koyukon (Denaakk'e) [example needed] Contrasts voiceless /j̊/ and voiced /j/ approximants.

Notes

  1. ^ a b Silverman et al. (1995), p. 83.
  2. ^ Bauer, Michael. "Final devoicing or Why does naoidh sound like Nɯiç?". Akerbeltz. Retrieved 11 December 2016.

References

  • Silverman, Daniel; Blankenship, Barbara; Kirk, Paul; Ladefoged, Peter (1995), "Phonetic Structures in Jalapa Mazatec", Anthropological Linguistics, The Trustees of Indiana University, 37 (1): 70–88, JSTOR 30028043

External links

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